Category Archives: Brexit

Don’t be shy, Nigel

It’s a strange thing.

He’s finally achieved his triumph. After all this time!

I expected to see Nigel Farage jumping about all over the place pointing out to us all the benefits we are now enjoying in the sunny uplands of Brexitland.

And making sure we’re in no doubt that it is he, Nigel Farage, whom we must thank for our immense good fortune.

Nigel Farage
Nigel Farage in 2017 [Photo: Gage Skidmore from Peoria, AZ, USA]

So where are you, Nigel?

© Chris Lawrence 2021

April 1 is coming early

This is from the Daily Telegraph website 14 January 2021, by someone called Jonathan Saxty:

We Brexiteers are being blamed for the problems we warned about

In reality, fault lies squarely with the Government and poor planning

As problems mount for UK businesses, both in dealing with mainland Europe and regarding Northern Ireland, don’t be surprised if Brexit and Brexiteers get the blame for what is a failure of Government, as the possibility of reintegration via the backdoor looms. Many businesses are reporting difficulties adapting to the post- Brexit trading landscape, with the Federation of Small Businesses claiming many small firms have not had the time, money or clarity to prepare. German logistics group DB Schenker became the latest parcels operator to suspend cross-border delivery, following a similar move by DPD. How did the Government not anticipate…

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Brexit, error correction and Germany

I mentioned last time a few qualms I had with David Deutsch’s views on Brexit, and in particular on First Past The Post (FPTP) vs Proportional Representation (PR). I should probably dig more into what Karl Popper had to say about error correction and falsifiability, specifically in relation to political rather than scientific theory. But until then, here are some more of my worries, this time about how Deutsch applies the idea of error correction to modern German history. Continue reading

David Deutsch and Brexit

David Deutsch is a clever man: physics professor at Oxford who pioneered quantum computing. He is also a keen promoter of fallibilism, the idea that we can be mistaken in anything we think or do. In this he sees himself as a follower of Karl Popper, a Viennese philosopher of science famous for (among other things) claiming that a theory is only truly scientific if it is falsifiable. Continue reading

Second EU referendum and democracy

peoples voteThere are those who say a second EU referendum would destroy faith in democracy. Their argument seems disingenuous. I can understand people taking this line if it is in their interest to. But for every person who sees a second referendum as an affront to democracy there could well be at least one other who sees it as an assertion of democracy. Continue reading